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December 20, 20128

Dear Friends and Team Matergenics

It is our  pleasure to have you here as our guest. This is to let you know that it is you that we care about, and you are very important to us.

A bit about Matergenics

As you may already know we have recently purchased the Exova-Pittsburgh testing facilities,  modern corrosion and materials testing equipment from Exova LLC. This is wonderful news, because we are  now able to lead team Matergenics  in a more beneficial and focused manner by introducing new technologies, innovation, testing and solution-based engineering.

We’ve surely come a long way.  We started out as MATCO Associates, a small engineering firm I established in 1994 near downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  Our business grew during those years because of your support, and also the hard work of our team members to provide you with the best service. In 2008 Valmont Industries, our largest client and a public company, purchased Matco, and later, sold it to Exova in 2015.  The opportunity came this year for us to gain ownership once again of the engineering firm I established in 1994.

We are now fully operational as Matergenics Inc. (www.matergenics.com), and look forward to providing you with the same great services that we were always pleased to deliver in the past. Please keep in mind that Matergenics consists of a diverse group of professionals with a combined skillset that has many layers of expertise combined with  insightful knowledge in the  fields of materials, corrosion engineering  and failure analysis. Our team remains the same and growing.  We have been adding technical personnel during the last  six months locally here in Pittsburgh and in Vancouver, Canada, our subsidiary that is growing exponentially at this time.

Equipment and capability upgrades include a brand-new Tescan Vega 3 scanning electron microscope with EDS analysis, a comprehensive soils lab for corrosivity testing , advanced electrochemical testing techniques, coatings shielding of cathodic protection testing, metallurgical failure analysis, onsite corrosion risk assessment and corrosion mitigation through coatings and computer-aided design of cathodic protection.  These technologically advanced approaches provide the cornerstone to new understandings of complex materials failures and corrosion risk assessment of aging  infrastructure. Whether large or small, we value your business and look forward to working with you for many years to come.  A special thank you to American Airlines, Clad Metals, Mitsubishi, Port Authority of Pittsburgh, Seagate, Cyrus Rice Water Consultants, Durabond, Momentive, The Techs, Weldon Labs, Berry Metal, Eaton Corporation, AC Dellovade, TIMET, Westinghouse, Columbia Gas, Ceati, S&ME, Nova Chemical, SBA, Southern California Edison, Kern River Gas Transmission Company, Cayman Utility Company, PEPCO, Biogen, Hope’s Windows, and our many other clients for supporting us over the years.

Mr. Roger’s once said “There is something of yourself that you leave at every meeting..”.

Let the festivity begin, let’s celebrate the season with good cheer!

Zee, PhD                                                                                               Carolyn Tome, CPA
Fellow of ASM, Fellow of NACE                                                            Controller
NACE Certified Materials Selection/Design/Coating

/Corrosion/Cathodic Protection Specialist

NACE Instructor for CP1. CP2, CP3, Corrosion Control

Through Design, Corrosion Basics, Condition Assessment

Phone: 412-952-9441

matergenic.com

zee@matergenics.com

 

Please visit Matergenics Museum of Materials and Failure Analysis

Matergenics’ Museum of Materials and Failure Analysis is established in Pittsburgh’s Matergenics facilities showcasing our lifelong accumulation of knowledge of materials and failure analysis. This museum, above all, is a storehouse of knowledge representing the fields of Materials Engineering and Corrosion Engineering. The purpose of this museum is to collect, preserve, interpret, and display materials failures of scientific significance for the education of Universities, Materials Scientists, Commercial and Industrial Companies and the public. From a visitor or technical community perspective, the purpose can also depend on one’s point of view. A trip to Matergenics museum can be an entertaining and enlightening way to spend the day. To a technical person, this museum might be seen as a way to learn from past failures and failure analysis and see failure analysis as a positive event.

Please visit Matergenics Museum of Materials and Failure Analysis at 100 Business Center Drive, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Monday through Thursday, 1:00-4:00 PM. You may call 412-788-1263 if you have any questions.

December 6, 2018

BC Hydro Team and Team Matergenics discussed Corrosion risk Assessment and Cathodic Protection strategy for BC Hydro assets on December 6th, 2018

Nov 1, 2018

Matergenics’ Museum of Materials and Failure Analysis is established in Pittsburgh’s Matergenics Laboratories showcasing our lifelong accumulation of knowledge of materials and failure analysis.
This museum, above all,  is a storehouse of knowledge representing the fields of Materials Engineering and Corrosion.
The purpose of this  museum is to collect, preserve, interpret, and display materials failures of scientific significance for the education of Universities, Materials Scientists, Commercial and Industrial Companies and the public. From a visitor or technical community perspective, the purpose can also depend on one’s point of view. A trip to Matergenics  museum can be an entertaining and enlightening way to spend the day.  To a technical person, this museum might be seen as a way to learn from past failures and failure analysis and see failure analysis as a positive event. 
Please visit Matergenics Museum of Materials  and Failure Analysis at 100 Business Center Drive, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Monday through Thursday, 1:00-4:00 PM.
You may call 412-788-1263 if you have any questions.

 

https://youtu.be/Qyia3k6csbA

 

         

Article Posted in Post Gazette on December 4, 2018

Welcome to the museum of materials failure.

Your guide is Mehrooz Zamanzadeh.

You’ll notice you’re in an unconventional space — a conference room inside Matergenics Inc., his consulting company in a nondescript suburban office building in Robinson.

Perhaps that’s fitting — failure is ubiquitous and mundane, so no grand hall is necessary.

Also, all failure is a consequence of human error, Mr. Zamanzadeh will explain. You won’t read that in textbooks, “but this is the truth,” he said.

Please be advised that when you get inside the room, you may touch the jagged pipes and sawed-off pieces of corroded metal you see in the glass cases. But do be gentle: The museum is the accumulation of Mr. Zamanzadeh’s entire career in corrosion engineering and failure analysis.

He’s authored hundreds of detailed reports to companies that hire him to figure out what went wrong during a building collapse or a pipeline rupture, sending his findings into the ether.

Wouldn’t it be great to have a place to unite all that failure under one roof — stripped of company names, stripped of shame and liability and public relations anxieties?

Who does he envision visiting a one-room “museum” of grotesque metal? He says anyone who is curious about how stuff works.

“Why? Because these failures will be repeated.”

Goal-oriented visitors might consider a scavenger hunt. Here are some ideas to get you started.

  • An engine that was shut down midflight because it was contaminated by leaking oil.
  • A piece of a purple pole from Disneyland.
  • A tin-coated roof shingle from Thomas Jefferson’s original estate in Monticello, Va.
  • A piece of a transmission tower that cracked in California a few years ago. It got cold and became brittle, just like the hull of the Titanic, Mr. Zamanzadeh can tell you. “It has happened many times in history, and it’s still happening.”
  • Anodes that are used to pump electrons to buried metal as a way of preventing or slowing corrosion. Did you know an anode protects the Fred Rogers statue on the North Shore?
  • An image of a pole from the parking lot of Pittsburgh International Airport that corroded and fell on a parked brand new BMW.

There are industries where failure has some sort of cachet: Tech entrepreneurs, especially those who’ve succeeded mightily, may grace their admirers with a TED Talk on the importance of failing.

Aluminum oxygen cylinder at Matergenics Inc. Material Failure Museum Thursday Nov. 29, 2018, in Robinson.

(Nate Guidry/Post-Gazette)

For obvious reasons, that’s not the attitude of utilities and infrastructure firms.

If an app fails, it could take a financial and even mental toll on its users. If a bridge fails, it could cost lives. A horrific scene may be splashed across newspaper pages, but the root cause report likely won’t be.

In many cases, it will never be made public, Mr. Zamanzadeh said. How many times has he served as an expert witness with that expertise locked away in a civil settlement? How, then, will the rest of us know what not to do in the future?

Samuel West, who founded another Museum of Failure, which lovingly showcases consumer flops (e.g. Harley-Davidson eau de toilette), has charged that “very few companies and organizations learn from their mistakes.

“We need to be better at learning from failure instead of sweeping things under the carpet and disassociating ourselves from failures,” Mr. West said.

For those of you who arrived in Robinson intending to visit Mr. West’s Museum of Failure, head about 4,100 miles east to Sweden.

To schedule a tour of Matergenics’ gallery of failure, call “Dr. Zee” at 412-952-9441 or email zee@matergenics.com.

Anya Litvak: alitvak@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1455.

Dr. Zee taught a Corrosion Course at NACE Training Center in Houston, Texas during  Oct 22 to Oct 27

Matergenics Presents a Paper at PUC Conference on September 5, 2018.

 

 

PPL Technical Personnel Visit Matergenics Corrosion Laboratories on September 4th, 2018

ASNT May 2018 Meeting was Hosted at Matergenics Facilities in Pittsburgh

Matergenics Team  and  Corrosion Risk Assessment of Coated Piles

 

  

Matergenics Cathodic Protection Training Short Course for Exelon Pepco Utility Division

Exelon Corporation (NYSE: EXC), now including the Pepco Holdings utilities, is the nation’s leading competitive energy provider, with 2015 revenues of approximately $34.5 billion.  Exelon’s six utilities deliver electricity and natural gas to approximately 10 million customers in Delaware, the District of Columbia, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania through its Atlantic City Electric, BGE, ComEd, Delmarva Power, PECO and Pepco subsidiaries.

Pepco Holdings’ family of energy-related businesses includes:

  • Pepco – a regulated electric utility delivering electricity to more than 815,000 customers in Maryland and the District of Columbia
  • Delmarva Power – a regulated electric and natural gas utility delivering electricity to more than 500,000 electric delivery customers in Delaware and the Delmarva Peninsula, and over 122,000 natural gas delivery customers in northern Delaware
  • Atlantic City Electric – a regulated electric utility delivering electricity to 545,000 customers in southern New Jersey
  • Pepco Energy Services – a leading provider of deregulated energy and energy-related services for residential, small business and large commercial customers

 

Training Seminar Topics Presented

• Fundamentals of Corrosion Engineering
• Corrosion Risk Assessment
• CP design, installation, trouble-shooting and monitoring • System-wide CP and case histories
• Close interval survey
• CP interference
• Cathodic Protection for T&D Structures
• Cathodic Protection for Pipeline
• CP Criteria
• Field & Laboratory and On-site investigations
• Coatings in conjunction with Cathodic protection
• Coating evaluation and failure analysis.
• Cathodic Protection Shielding
• Laboratory and Field Testing of CP Shielding
• Close Interval Survey
• AC Interference and Stray Current
• Case Histories
• Points to remember

Zee Matergenics – Cathodic Protection Course Brochure

 

Dr. Zee taught NACE CPII Class at Claysville Training Center in West Virginia during during May 6 through May 10th.

ASNT Pittsburgh Chapter hold their monthly meeting at Matergenics 100 Business Drive , Pittsburgh, Pa. Dr. Zee presented a talk on Non-destructive techniques in corrosion risk assessment of underground facilities.

ASNT Pittsburgh – Chairman’s Message – May 2018 (1) 2

Appalachian Pipelines Association invited Dr. Zee of Matergenics to speak ath their  May presentation meeting

  • Location

  • Hilton Garden Inn/Southpointe
  • 1000 Corporate Drive
  • Canonsburg, PA 15317
  • Agenda

  • Networking:  5:00 – 6:00
  • Dinner: 6:00 – 7:00
  • APA Business: 7:00 – 7:15
  • Speaker Presentation: 7:15 – 8:00

Speaker Bio

May’s Speaker will be Dr. Mehrooz Zee.  Dr. Zee’s presentation for the APA will address the corrosion risk assessment and corrosion mitigation in oil and gas in industry. Time permitting he will present case histories on coated pipeline failure, cathodic protection shielding, AC interference and failure analysis root cause investigation case histories for gas pipeline explosions in Pennsylvania.

He is a NACE Certified Corrosion Specialist with over 28 years of practical experience in corrosion engineering, materials selection/design and cathodic protection/coatings. He has worked in the oil and gas, and electric power utility industries throughout his career and has resolved a wide range of materials and corrosion engineering solutions for these industries. He has been setting up or improving corrosion control assessment program for large energy related companies.

Dr. Zee is one of the foremost leading corrosion engineering experts in North America and beyond.  Among his awards for his contributions to materials and corrosion engineering are Fellow Awards from both the American Society for Materials (ASM) and the National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE), a truly rare occurrence.  He is also the recipient of the prestigious AUCSC’s Colonel George C. Cox Outstanding Award, given in recognition of his contributions to underground corrosion engineering.

He has been active in development of standard practices that are geared towards corrosion risk assessment, corrosion mitigation, cathodic protection, coating assessment, and repair of damaged coatings for NACE (National Association of Corrosion engineers) and IEEE (Institute of electrical and electron engineers).

 

APA May Meeting and Matergenics: Over 45 people attended and it was a lively meeting

 

ASNT May Meeting  and Matergenics 

 

 

 

1-Matergenics CP News Letter

Final 2018 Matergenics CP News letter (2)

2-Matergenics NACE 2018 Publications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paper No. 10544

Cathodic Protection, Coatings that Shield Cathodic Protection, Stress Corrosion Cracking and Corrosion Assessment in Aging Coated Pipe Lines and Buried Utility Structures

Mehrooz Zamanzadeh, George T. Bayer, Anil Kumar Chikkam 100 Business Center Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15205

ABSTRACT

Underground coated structures such as pipelines, transmission towers & poles, galvanized guy anchors, tanks and coated galvanized anchors are aging and are at risk of corrosion failure due to coating shielding cathodic protection, localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Those tasked with maintaining these structures require an in-depth understanding of the locations where these aging pipelines are at risk of localized corrosion due to cathodic protection shielding. Corrosion failures in aging pipelines are either sudden catastrophic ruptures or gradual leaks due to localized corrosion. Corrosion failures in transmission structures or galvanized anchors are also at risk of loss in thickness and catastrophic ruptures. Major factors associated with these corrosion areas are coating dis-bondment, blistering/delamination, the presence of moisture, corrosive soils, inadequate cathodic protection and cathodic protection shielding. These areas have a much higher statistical probability of catastrophic failure and rupture. In pipelines, most of the time initiation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and pitting corrosion are detected by coincidence in excavation and digs and is not targeted or predicted by analysis of corrosion performance parameters. Internal or In-line inspection (ILI) tools have limited capability for detecting or identifying stress corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion initiation. Here we would like to elaborate on corrosion risk associated with coatings that shield cathodic protection.

Key words: cathodic protection shielding by coatings, stress corrosion cracking (SCC); pitting corrosion; corrosion risk assessment; soil resistivity; soil corrosivity mapping; coating dis-bondment; cathodic protection.

C2018-11140 2

 

Paper No. 10544

Cathodic Protection, Coatings that Shield Cathodic Protection, Stress Corrosion Cracking and Corrosion Assessment in Aging Coated Pipe Lines and Buried Utility Structures

Mehrooz Zamanzadeh, George T. Bayer, Anil Kumar Chikkam 100 Business Center Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15205

ABSTRACT

Underground coated structures such as pipelines, transmission towers & poles, galvanized guy anchors, tanks and coated galvanized anchors are aging and are at risk of corrosion failure due to coating shielding cathodic protection, localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Those tasked with maintaining these structures require an in-depth understanding of the locations where these aging pipelines are at risk of localized corrosion due to cathodic protection shielding. Corrosion failures in aging pipelines are either sudden catastrophic ruptures or gradual leaks due to localized corrosion. Corrosion failures in transmission structures or galvanized anchors are also at risk of loss in thickness and catastrophic ruptures. Major factors associated with these corrosion areas are coating dis-bondment, blistering/delamination, the presence of moisture, corrosive soils, inadequate cathodic protection and cathodic protection shielding. These areas have a much higher statistical probability of catastrophic failure and rupture. In pipelines, most of the time initiation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and pitting corrosion are detected by coincidence in excavation and digs and is not targeted or predicted by analysis of corrosion performance parameters. Internal or In-line inspection (ILI) tools have limited capability for detecting or identifying stress corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion initiation. Here we would like to elaborate on corrosion risk associated with coatings that shield cathodic protection.

Key words: cathodic protection shielding by coatings, stress corrosion cracking (SCC); pitting corrosion; corrosion risk assessment; soil resistivity; soil corrosivity mapping; coating dis-bondment; cathodic protection.

INTRODUCTION

What is cathodic protection shielding?

Definition: cathodic protection shielding is defined as preventing or diverting the cathodic protection current from its intended path. Figures 1 – 7 show the behavior of the “shielding” and so called “non-shielding” coatings.

From NACE SP0169-2013

Nonshielding Coating System: A coating system with a failure mode (loss of adhesion, etc.) that does not prevent distribution of cathodic protection current to the metal substrate.

Shielding Coting System: (1) Protecting; protective cover against mechanical damage; (2) preventing or diverting cathodic protection current from its natural path.

There are over 2.9 million miles of pipe lines many of them aging coated pipelines transporting natural gas, oil, and hazardous liquid in the United States. Close to 50 percent of gas transmission and gathering pipe lines were constructed in the 1950’s and 1960’s, over fifty years old. Barrier protective coatings and cathodic protection (CP) have been used to prevent corrosion. There are 20 million transmission and distribution, over 20% with barrier coating. However, dis-bondment tape or coating in conjunction with cathodic protection shielding can result in less than adequate protection, no protection, pitting and or stress corrosion cracking in corrosive soils.

Ruschau and Digulio1 noted that cathodic protection shielding is defined by NACE SP0169 as “preventing or diverting the cathodic protection current from its intended path.”2 Based on this definition, the function of a

3-Important Message from Dr.Zee

November 15 – 16, 2016, Sheraton Pentagon City, Arlington, Virginia, USA

corrosion-2017

 

 

GLIG_Banner
CEATI 8th Annual Grounding & Lightning ConferenceNACE CORROSION 2017

March 26 – 30, 2017, Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

 

 

nace-western

http://wac.nace.org                        Nov 28-31, 2017, LasVegas, Nevada

ABSTRACT

Pipelines are among the most common means used for transporting hazardous gases and liquids in the United States. However, underground pipelines are aging and are at risk of corrosion failure due to coating shielding cathodic protection, pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Those tasked with maintaining these pipelines require an in-depth understanding of the locations where these aging pipelines are at risk of localized corrosion attack and stress corrosion cracking due to cathodic protection shielding. Corrosion failures in aging pipelines are either sudden catastrophic ruptures or gradual leaks due to localized corrosion. Major factors associated with these corrosion areas are coating disbondment, blistering/delamination, the presence of moisture, corrosive soils, AC interference, inadequate cathodic protection and cathodic protection shielding. These areas have a much higher statistical probability of catastrophic failure and rupture. Most of the time initiation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and pitting corrosion are detected by coincidence in excavation and digs and is not targeted or predicted by analysis of corrosion performance parameters. Internal or In-line inspection (ILI) tools have limited capability for detecting or identifying stress corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion initiation. Here we would like to elaborate on corrosion risk/SCC and cathodic protection shielding by coatings.

Key words: cathodic protection shielding by coatings, stress corrosion cracking (SCC); pitting corrosion; corrosion risk assessment; soil resistivity; soil corrosivity mapping; coating disbondment; cathodic protection.

 

     

Failure Analysis Report Published in The Analyst 

analysis

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